SECAC

Incorporeal Transformations

For the first time in a long time I took a weekend for myself, and stayed in Statesboro instead of venturing out into the great beyond for school, work, play, or educational purposes and actually accomplished a number of things on my to-do list. I managed to do laundry, grocery shop, and pay attention to my two cats-all of which needed to be done badly in terms of my home-life and the general maintenance that is required on ones part for keeping their living quarters, well, livable.


Studio time has been used to great success I must say, in that I have really up'ed my game this week in terms of work completed and started. It is midterm week at Southern, which means midterms were made, given, and graded. New projects were distributed ate discussed, and this next week will consist of due dates and critiques within my classrooms. That hasn't slowed my progress in the studio though. I am at about what I will say is the 95% completion of my largest piece in the making, and intend on finishing it off later today, along with a few smaller pieces I am working on.

Last Friday was the all faculty critique day, since then my presentation has been re-examined in our class group crit Monday and Tuesday. I appreciated the honesty of my classmates and what they had to say about my current work on when they got a chance to see it in person. Even though they saw the pieces in their "half baked state" because the kiln they were misfired and nothing fully fluxed, I feel they could still see somewhat my vision. The partially developed colors and the hazy white-wash over the five pieces wasn't talked about much to my relief, and instead we discussed the forms themselves, the craftsmanship, and their maximalist aesthetic.

My pieces after the misfire of the kiln. It did not reach temperature, so the pieces are covered in a hazy white wash, which is the clear glaze that did not flux fully.

We also talked about all my major influences in the work and where I was headed. I read off to them my topics of interest, which I have mentioned multiple times in previous blog posts, but my professor Derek brought up some new points I hadn't thought of. He mentioned that I should look into the more "surface" and "face value" topics that my work references. I brought up people like Hieronymus Bosch and Bernard Palissy, who are both from the 16th century as some of my historical influences and then all the new contemporary artists I referenced in last weeks blog ATL Vs NYC. Derek told me that my work has much more potential than just what I've been touching on and that bringing in some current politics such as the new EPA regulations as of 2017. I intend on discussing the topic further with him this week during my studio visit with him on Tuesday.

Wednesday was a day full of building, and back tracking in my notebook for past references, comments, and techniques. I have been trying very hard to make it a point to expand upon all the information given to me when someone references an artists, or a topic to me. Usually I would just go and look up whatever was said to me and then read a bit on it and move on, but now I try and relate it all. Seems like it would be obvious to have done this in the first place but in all honestly I wasn't starting to connect all the bigger ideas until recently, with the help of my current theory class, Art in the Age of Networks taught by Jason Hoelscher.

This is where the title of this blog post comes into play, sorta.

In class we have been reading articles all relating to system aesthetics and the network analogy to the artworld and the artworld discourse, that we as students of art play a role in. Even though I am just scratching the surface of the theories within the artworld and how they are all inner related to one another I still find the theory itself fascinating to say the least. Every essay we read is a new brain busting explosion of ideas, and concepts that opens up a whole new set of "adjacent possibilities" in the grand scheme "effectuations" (all these quotation-ed words are new things that I am just beginning to understand, so bare with me). Things like "Incorporeal Transformations", which is Deleuze and Guattari’s philosophical account of expression and content in “The Geology of Morals” and “Postulates of Linguistic” chapters of their book A Thousand Plateaus. It is from my understanding the idea of change without actual change occurring-- just a change based off of implication, context, and language. This along with the collective assemblages of enunciation in language can then open up new understandings to art related things such as a vitrine. Which is what I am writing my argument driven paper on for the class, as well as hopefully later presenting a small version at Southerns Graduate Research Symposium, and then the full developed version of the paper at SECAC in October in their panel regarding the use of a vitrine and it's implied context.

So what does all this theory talk have to do with my artwork then? If I am getting hung up on the language of things, how does my art then relate back to it all? Well I am learning that it is all in the way you talk about things that ends up making the art work successful or not. Of course the artist statement is just a small part of the "whole" of being an artist, but how you talk about the work in general is also key. Knowing the discourse, or all the presuppositions (PSP's) about the work in question places you within the three art world ontologies, and lets your opinion actually matter. By knowing what my work is, and is not, I can explain better to my audience what is it I am making, and most importantly why. For me, the articles we have been reading, the presentations I have been preparing for is all just part of the bigger game, again, as a "whole".

Knowing the bigger context provides the content for the work. This I am learning to be fact, and I feel like my work is developing along the same speed of understanding, the more I read and write about my work.

In terms of new developments within my research practice for influencing artists, and artworks I have been back tracking and looking into old references. After spending most of my Saturday prepping for this weeks overhaul in the studio by making/doing all of the following:

  • 150 triangle test tiles for glaze tests
  • testing new materials/textures for possibly making my work "lighter in weight"
  • new glaze tests at lower temperatures at cone 04, instead of cone 6
  • developing a new gallon of casting slip slightly different from my original formula
  • making a half batch of my porcelain dunking slip, to cast more fabric
  • hunting and gathering $56.00 of ceramic plates, teacups, mugs, saucers, and bowls from goodwill
  • re-firing my "half-baked pieces" to cone 6, only to realize most of my bright colors burned out
  • finishing up my large piece to 95% completion
  • casting a whole new set of molds (about 15 different molds)
  • started on 3 new smaller pieces (two frogs, and an owl)
  • tweaked my artists statement and the specific terminology used

I really haven't looked too deeply into a new artist, because I spent so much of my time actually making in the studio along with digging into the theory of incorporeal transformations by reading additional material by Deleuze and Guattari. I needed it though. I needed to just work and try to generate my own, internal influence this week.

Sometimes I feel like even though all the reading and research I do is all beneficial to my work, finding that balance between working and reading has been hard for me. I tend to go all in on something. Either I read for hours on end, or a work. I'm not too good at doing one or the other, if it isn't obvious in my blog posts (They are much longer than the required length and cover much more than they need to.) But this is just how I am, and how I have been working since I got here (to grad school). Everything is written down, and researched to the point where I feel at least comfortable with the topics.

Fresh out the re-fire. My piece with some of the colors washed out, because of the high heat.

My professor Jeff keeps telling me that as long as I keep working the answers to what the work is about will come, in time. So I just keep putting in the hours and hope that eventually I'll get some kind of "ahh-ha" moment. I feel that I am close. I think after I sit down and actually have a solid meeting with my chair for my thesis committee, and get some of my "facts" laid out about my work I will be in an even better place than I am now.

Plans for next week are to dive into working on a new piece incorporating more negative space into the work, as well as less weight. I am also having to make new sculptures from cloth, string, fabric, and cardboard, just so I can then break them for use in my current work.  All that materials research I did two semesters ago, to make my "fabric" sculptures, has now become a part of the process for the new works seen here. I also have all my 30hr MFA Candidacy Review artwork up on my website now, so look for that final upload so you can see the jumping off point from last semester to what I am doing now.

Here's to being half way through the semester already!

Already Existing, But Still New

One week into the fourth semester of my grad experience and despite it being the repetitive process of coming to class on time, doing the assignments, and not binge eating at all hours of the day...its still all around a new experience.

So yes, lets take a moment and bask in the glory of the newness of things. Much will be changing in 2017- to include a new president of the free world for better or worse, a solar eclipse that hasn't happened since 1918, a march of women on the White House, new gym memberships that will get at least some use, technology will continue to evolve, conflicts shall arise, and we will all get a little older. But let's get real, all of these things have already been happening in the world for who knows how long, and yet with each new year they magically become new again, and the bit of hope in our own existence is renewed.  It's a cycle, endless as it may seem, the only things really that come with a new year are realizations of what was not accomplished in the last.

Therefore I want to talk about some things that I did not accomplish and what I learned that I intend to apply to 2017 moving forward. They are less resolutions and more so just board concepts I hope to apply to myself as we circle around this bright star.

1. Understanding- What I mean by this is that I honestly just want to take the time to understand better. To listen to what someone has to say and before I give my option, take a moment and reflect on what was just given to me and then and only then respond if it is actually worth my two sense. Often I noticed last year I had a tendency of letting my strong personality dominate others. I am strong willed, a leader, and have a extreme confidence which is great for what I want to do in life, but not so great when it comes to actually taking the time to understand those around me who are less confident or who have opposing ideas/personalities. Understanding is not a resolution, it's just a better way of going about my day in general.

2. Knowledge- I will, at all opportunities, look into and read up on things suggested to me. In grad school its not uncommon to have ten new things you'd never heard about thrown at you in one conversation. This year I intend to look into all of them on some level. Knowledge is more than understanding, which is why it's number two on my list of things because it's being able to take what you know and apply it through understanding as an application, a tool.  Reading essays on art theory will boost my own art process as well as my teaching in the classroom. Plus I'm sure we could all use a little less social media, television, and internet for a change and actually get into some literature thats been around for decades.

3. Health- Now this last one also builds on the previous two in a way. Over the last four semesters here I have taken it upon myself to be mindful of my heath while in school. It is easy to lose track of an eating schedule (especially when you teach a class from 11-1:30...the prime lunch hours) and then consume low quality, cheap food. Grad school does that to you. The lack of money, time, and energy is begging for health problems down the road. Therefore health is a combination of understanding and knowledge. Understanding that I need sleep, water, and exercise, and knowing that I can educate myself on bettering my daily life through research into a healthier lifestyle.

Understanding, Knowledge, and Health-what do these have to do with a grad students art blog you might be asking? Well they all already existed but now I am giving them priority over the smaller things in my life.  I can already see small changes in the way I am going about my day now that I put a focus on these three broad concepts. For instance I did some significant digging on how to throw larger ceramic pots without hurting myself and came across an immense amount of information that I didn't even know was out there. This interest was spurred on by somewhat of a failure of mine from last semester in that I limited the scale in my work and gave in to gravity.  This year I am changing that for the better I hope. I've got quite a few things going in my studio right now in terms of larger thrown pieces but I can already tell that just after this first week and the few discussions I've had with my professors that I need to sit down and draw out my plans. At this point in my program I can't go about my work so intuitively, and I need to develop my sketches of my ideas further before I begin actually making. Of course the work will evolve as I make it, but I need an end goal in mind before I begin.


As for artists that I came across this week while looking for inspiration and technique ideas, I found Bryan Yerian. In looking for a youtube video on composite, or coil throwing I found this artist and then realized that his artists statement is actually quite referential to my own. Here is a snippet of his artist statement:

I view art as a byproduct of a process; the pursuit of preserving a moment in time. My artworks are reactionary artifacts inspired by life experiences and memories. Objects, materials, colors, and patterns are the vehicles I use to communicate the striking contrasts I observe in everyday experiences.

Mold making is a symbolic process of capturing and preserving an objects likeness. By utilizing molds to replicate objects I am able to transform objects into symbols meant to evoke a sense of familiarity, as well as unknown. The objects I choose to replicate carry inherent meanings I associate with contrasting themes such as mortality, vulnerability, comfort and safety, and real and surreal.

I intentionally use archival and timeless materials as a method of preservation and transformation. Clay and glaze are unique materials, in that they can easily mimic other known materials, such as metal and fabric, and are simultaneously densely archival, yet extremely fragile. These are characteristics I intentionally exploit in my art.
— http://www.bryanyerian.com/artist-statement.html

His work looks interesting but I don't see the relationship with the words in the statement to the actual work, which is my exact same problem so I've been told. Connections with the concepts to the actual work is the struggle we all face as artists but it's really the struggle of a graduate student and the ten or so professors critiquing work. I've got to connect the ideas in my head to the work in my hands at some point, or at least get closer than I am now. The video on composite throwing surely helped me though. Already in the studio I have three new vessels working, and a forth made from building together thrown donuts and hollow bowls. Here's hoping that will pan out a bit more.


I know that the goal of these blog posts is for use to research artists and get involved in their work on some level, but I take them more as a stream of consciousness in terms of whats happening within my studio and then with myself in the larger art world. I was bad and didn't post a single blog post last semester. So much has happened to me since I last wrote back in April 2016, that I feel a brief but elaborate recap is in order.

First of all I went to Ireland for five weeks as the resident assistant for the European Council Water Ireland Program and had the time of my life. Learned how to direct 44 students in a foreign country and did my job well enough to be offered a return position for Summer 2017 as the single resident assistant.

I went to conferences. A lot of them. Specifically I attended SECAC in Roanoke, Virginia with my friend Cyndy Epps and presented on a panel titled Letters to a Young Artist. My paper focused on the "artist on their phone" and how media is interfering wth their working process in the studio. I also presented at SLSA in Atlanta, Georgia on a senior panel for theory in art regarding "object-ness". I was the youngest on the panel, and also the only graduate student in a group of four other well established professors across the country. At SLSA I also presented a poster on the Inherent Qualities of Clay and was one of four art students in the entire poster session of art historians and theorists, which was over two-hundred in number.

My show Trifecta, which I curated with my friend Jessamy McManus was a great success over the summer at Augusta University in Augusta, Georgia. It had eighteen artists from across the state participate, and highlighted the three public master of fine art schools in the state- Georgia Southern, Georgia State, and University of Georgia. Trifecta prompted a connection to within all three schools and has since developed a "show swap" within the universities as well as Trifecta 2.0 happening this summer at the GA State campus. So that was an enormous success in my book!

In December the graduate group went to Miami again for Art Basel 2016, and this time brought along a few deserving undergraduate seniors as well. The trip brought about discussions of art and the art market as well as the context of the fairs and their purposes.  Places like Pulse and NADA, who have more so emerging artists verses the big names like Art Basel who focus on the well known and the classics.

I also taught that dreaded 2-2 load at Georgia Southern that I mentioned in my previous blog posts and it in fact was not that bad at all. I actually really loved it.  I ended up teaching 2D Design and 3D Design Monday thru Thursday in addition to taking my own classes, and am currently doing the same thing again this semester. Teaching I feel is what really got me to the point of my three new years goals/concepts.  It put myself into a bigger picture and allowed me to see myself in a new light. So I have immense gratitude for the opportunity given to me in that respect.


As for 2017 so far, I have kept up with myself but it's too early to tell what will happen this semester. Jessamy and I bought out tickets this week to attend the CAA Conference in New York in February and thats about as much excitement as I can muster at the moment. I intend to continue presenting at conference, want to get into more shows, and am in progress of trying to establish opportunities elsewhere for myself. Just have to keep pushing forward and things will happen.

Thanks for the read if you made it this far and welcome to 2017, the new year, new semester, and new opportunities!

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