Atlanta Gallery Hop

One week of rest or one week of work-thats the coin toss that is "Spring Break 2017".

 

The break doesn't officially start until tomorrow, but already I have taken advantage of the down time and caught up on some things I've neglected around my house and my studio. I washed the floors of my studio space and wiped down the dust that had accumulated everywhere. I finished my largest sculpture and set it up to dry at a slow and even pace...hopefully. I slept in for a change and tried to use the day light savings to my advantage and readjust my internal clock by just sleeping through the time change. Most importantly though I made it a point to use the first weekend of the break to make my way up to Atlanta with some of my fellow grads for a day of gallery hopping around town.

I picked up Usman early at 6:15am on Friday and we headed for Midtown down I-16 for the long three hour and twenty minute drive. We left early to avoid traffic and ended up getting there much earlier than planned, so we had breakfast at West Egg. Afterwards we drove over to our first scheduled stop of the day, the Atlanta Contemporary Art Center. It didn't open until eleven so we walked down to Amélie's French Bakery for a coffee while we waited for Jessamy, Cyndy, and Josie (Cyndy's daughter) to arrive. While we waited we looked at all the different Mona Lisa portraits on the walls and made the joke that one of Zak's paintings would fit right in with the theme of the place. Once the rest of the crew showed up and it was closer to opening time we made our way down to the see the current exhibition on display by outsider artist Lonnie Holley called I Snuck Off the Slave Ship, on display until April 2nd. The gallery director walked us through a few of the pieces and got rid of Josie's hiccups for her. We even got to meet her dog Monster, a mix between a pit bull and a dachshund. The show is described as:

Atlanta Contemporary Art Center (Atlanta Contemporary) is pleased to announce a solo exhibition with Lonnie Holley. Holley is a man of many myths and talents. Born in Jim Crow-era Birmingham, Alabama, as the seventh of 27 children, Holley traveled across the South and held a wide array of jobs before making his first artwork at the age of 29.

Well known for his assemblages, Holley incorporates natural and man-made objects into totemic sculptures. Materials such as steel scrap, sandstone, plastic flowers, crosses, and defunct machines commemorate places, people, and events. The exhibition will feature a selection of sculptures and drawings on loan from the artist. In addition to these works, Holley will create site specific installations reflective of the spontaneous and improvisational nature of his creative process.

Curator Daniel Fuller says “Lonnie Holley is one of the most influential artists and musicians of the 20th/21st centuries. His powerful work is improvisational and free in that it goes beyond the autobiographical and chronicles daily life and history of people all over the South. It is as much concerned with all of mother earth as it is cosmic.”
— Atlanta Contemporary Art Center Wedsite
 

Afterwards we went to a few galleries downtown to include the Hathaway Gallery, the Sandler Hudson, and the KAI LIN gallery. We had planned on going to the MOCA but we ran out of time and opted to just go to White Space gallery instead where we met the gallery assistant Emily Sorgenfrei. We talked to her for nearly an hour about how she got her job in the gallery, the things she did along the way, and how we could propose our work to the space. (Unfortunately, Marcia Wood, one of my favorite galleries was between shows and wasn't open.) I also made my way to the Signature Gallery in Buckhead, which ended up being the highlight of my weekend. The Signature Gallery, run by Carr McCuiston located on Roswell Road NE Atlanta, GA houses contemporary ceramic works by just about all the artist that I am interested in currently. It was cool going into the gallery and meeting SarahBeth Merritt, the gallery assistant, and talking to her about all the works on display. She graduated from Georgia State three or four-ish years ago and has been working at Signature, as well as the Callanwolde Fine Arts Center. My sisters friend Abbey Hull also works there currently and she's been a greta help in answering my questions about the studio and how it's run.

Basically, I got a lot out of this weekend. I made some great connections with the staff at the galleries I would like to show at in the future. It's all about making those small one on one connections, and really pushing forward with getting your work out in the world that matters. I feel like this weekend might have helped that "snowball" get rolling.


After all the gallery fun Cyndy and Josie left and the rest of us went to Krog Street Market for a beer and some small eats. We ended up eating at this place called Nexto, where my sister works. It's a Japanese Noodle restaurant and we ate our weight in ramen deliciousness.

Saturday morning I went to Davens Ceramic supply store for some things for my studio. It's basically an adult toy store if you're into clay. I also acquired a long list of new books to purchase after perusing the selection at Davens. I took the opportunity to go to the Atlanta Barnes and Nobles and glanced through their craft ceramic section for books and ended up getting the three listed below on glazing and making. Very exciting stuff to introduce into my work.


As for studio time, here is a few snippets of whats been happening. Most things are still in progress, drying, or getting ready for more firings.

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